Interview with Joerg Thomaier, Head of IP Bayer Group about IP Management and Filing Strategy – Santa Claus is Coming to Town and Copyright Issues – Image Trademark Search – IP Fridays – Episode 43

Dr. Joerg Thomaier

Dr. Joerg Thomaier

Today we have an Interview with Joerg Thomaier, Head of IP Bayer Group about IP management and the filing strategy of Bayer. Trisha Volpe has a story about teh famous song “Santa Claus is Coming to Tow”n and Copyright Issues. Finally, we tell you about a very cool new feature of the CTM trademark database, which you can now search for similar images by submitting image files:

https://oami.europa.eu/eSearch/

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Interview with Carrie A. Hefte, Senior Company Counsel Intellectual Property Wells Fargo – Decision of the Enlarged Board of Appeal G 1/14 – Japan joins TMView – Episode 42 – IP Fridays

Carrie Hefte

Carrie Hefte

Today we have an Interview with Carrie A. Hefte, Senior Company Counsel Intellectual Property Wells Fargo. She will give us the inside scoop of intellectual property management inside Wells Fargo. Then we talk about the most recent decision of the Enlarged Board of Appeal of the European Patent Office G 1/14. Also, Japan joins TMView and what that means.

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Interview with Joerg Thomaier – Head of IP, Bayer Group – Compulsory Licenses – Reform of the CTM System – German Federal Supreme Court Rules on Color Red – Episode 41 – IP Fridays

Dr. Joerg Thomaier

Dr. Joerg Thomaier

This week we have an interview with Joerg Thomaier – Head of IP, Bayer Group and we chat about compulsory licenses and India. We also inform you about the reform of the CTM system. Finally, we report on a decisions of the German Federal Supreme Courton a color trademark red – Episode 41 – IP Fridays

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Google Books in court: Keep calm and click on

UK Only Article: 
standard article

Issue: 

Reinventing the company

Fly Title: 

Google Books in court

Rubric: 

Snippets are not an infringement of copyright

Location: 

NEW YORK

Main image: 

20151024_USD001_0.jpg

THE hero of “The Library of Babel”, a story by Jorge Luis Borges, loses himself in a gargantuan repository of every possible book in the universe. Google Books isn’t quite that vast, but it is big. Since 2004, Google has teamed up with libraries to scan over 20m titles—many of them out of print—and put them on the web for all to view. Users cannot read whole books unless they are in the public domain. But unlike the sad character in Borges’s tale, who never finds the library catalogue, Google Books browsers can search for specific phrases and read snippets of countless volumes, free.
A decade ago a group of alarmed authors sued Google, claiming the service cut into their copyrights. After years of legal machinations, a …

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Words for the masses: Google Books wins a court battle

IN “THE LIBRARY OF BABEL”, a story by Jorge Borges, a man loses himself in a gargantuan repository of every possible book in the universe. Google Books is not quite that vast, but it is big. Since 2004, Google has teamed with libraries to scan over 20m titles—including many that are out of print—and put them on the web for anyone to access. Users cannot read entire books, unless they are in the public domain. But unlike the sad hero in Borges’s dystopian tale, who never locates the catalogue to the collection, Google Books browsers can search for specific phrases and, without paying, read snippets of countless tomes.A decade ago, a group of authors sued Google, claiming the service cut into their copyrights. After years of legal machinations, a federal district court ruled in favour of the internet giant in 2013. The plaintiffs—including Jim Bouton, author of “Ball Four”, and Betty Miles, who wrote “The Trouble with Thirteen”—appealed to the Second Circuit Court in New York and on October 16th, they were rebuffed again.How can a company get away with digitising millions of books without the authors’ consent and showing them to the world? In his ruling, Judge Pierre Leval explains that copyright law gives “potential creators” the exclusive right to copy their own work in order to expand everybody’s “access to knowledge”. It’s not all about enriching authors. The …

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